Cocoon Youth Storytelling Hosts Third Episode March 10

Catlin Culture Culture Daily News Local Culture

Editor’s Note: A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that Cocoon was founded by Nico Hamacher ’15, not Renee Jenkinson. The article has been corrected.

Cocoon Youth Storytelling will hold its third live storytelling event at the Mission Theater on March 10 at 6 p.m. The event will feature eight storytellers from four different high schools. Storytellers will share personal stories, live, without notes, all on the theme of acceptance.

Cocoon Youth Storytelling will hold its third live storytelling event at the Mission Theater on March 10 at 6 p.m. (Photo: Reuben Schafir '17)
Cocoon Youth Storytelling will hold its third live storytelling event at the Mission Theater on March 10 at 6 p.m. (Photo: Reuben Schafir ’17)

Cocoon was founded in 2014 by Renee Jenkinson. Based on the Moth Radio Hour, Cocoon was created in order to provide high school students with a place to share personal experiences and learn the art of storytelling. Cocoon hosts events every few months at which youth storytellers may pitch ideas. After the pitch, students workshop their stories with storyteller and Catlin Gabel teacher Renee Jenkinson, and ultimately get to share their stories at a live event.

Catlin Gabel Senior Julian '16 telling his story of fear at the Hollywood Theater at the October 2015 show. (Photo: Reuben Schafir '17)
Catlin Gabel Senior Julian ’16 telling his story of fear at the Hollywood Theater at the October 2015 show. (Photo: Reuben Schafir ’17)

“If we can get up there, step outside of our comfort zone, do something that we normally wouldn’t, and share maybe some very intimate details with one another… having a place for that is so important,” says the co-producer of the upcoming show Regan Magee ’18 on why Cocoon is important to her.

“Telling stories is one of the oldest crafts around and is still just as pertinent today as it was 500 years ago,” says the co-producer of the upcoming show Katie McClannan ’18. “By sharing stories you can learn, teach, laugh, relate, and entertain.”

Cocoon’s first show, produced by Catlin Gabel Graduate Nico Hamacher ’15 in March, 2015, was an immediate success. It featured nine storytellers sharing their experiences involving risk, and hosted over 100 audience members. The second show, held at the Hollywood Theater in October of 2015, was a resounding success as well and featured seven storytellers. The theme of that night was fear.

Whether for entertainment, education, or connection, Cocoon has become widely popular.

“I participate in Cocoon because I think that storytelling is a fantastic way to reflect of the human experience and relate to others,” says McClannan. “I also just love to hear other’s

stories and being able to have greater insight on perspectives that are not my own.”

“Everyone, especially youth has a story to share,” notes Magee.

Recordings of past performances are accessible on Cocoon’s website here.

Tickets for Cocoon’s March 10 show are available here.

The second show, held at the Hollywood Theater in October of 2015, was a resounding success as well and featured seven storytellers. (Photo: Reuben Schafir '17)
The second show, held at the Hollywood Theater in October of 2015, was a resounding success as well and featured seven storytellers. (Photo: Reuben Schafir ’17)